Note from the Editors

 

   SEEING RED 

    ENDU(RED) ADMI(RED)
    DESI(RED) WONDE(RED)
    RUMO(RED) ADO(RED)
    ENAMO(RED) INSPI(RED)
    DISCOVE(RED) SAC(RED)
    HUNGE(RED) WONDE(RED)
    EXPLO(RED) FEATU(RED)
    AUTHO(RED) SEA(RED)
    DA(RED) UNCENSO(RED)
    SOA(RED) ADVENTU(RED)

 

 

    


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The Problem with Promises


Is that they are both fragile, like a vintage vase,
edging toward the lip of the mantle, the detritus
pushing day after day — slow and steady and over —

and stubborn, no allowance for change. Like oaks,
they are rooted in beauty and shade for the true.
The liar can rest here a moment, but he will not sleep.

It doesn’t matter if the limbs are rotting, leaves diseased,
if the sidewalk is cracking from the pressure of all that
glory, it won’t budge. It will have to be cut down.

And this will take either many men and tools, loud
generators and teeth, or wind and a weak spot.
And everyone will see it fall. You never promised

me anything. And still, these branches at my feet,
fragments on the floor, the sawdust and the sweeping.
The gorgeous gone, and what to take its place?


Leslie Anne Mcilroy won the 2001 Word Press Poetry Prize for her full-length collection Rare Space and the 1997 Slipstream Poetry Chapbook Prize for her chapbook Gravel. She also took first place in the1997 Chicago Literary Awards Competition judged by Gerald Stern. Her second full-length book, Liquid Like This, was published by Word Press in 2008. Leslie’s work appears in numerous publications including American Poetry: The Next Generation, Dogwood, The Emily Dickinson Award Anthology, The Mississippi Review, Nimrod International Journal of Prose & Poetry and Pearl. Leslie works as a copywriter in Pittsburgh, PA, where she lives with her daughter Silas, and writer/guitarist, Don Bertschman, with whom she performs her poetry.


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