Note from the Editors

 

   SEEING RED 

    ENDU(RED) ADMI(RED)
    DESI(RED) WONDE(RED)
    RUMO(RED) ADO(RED)
    ENAMO(RED) INSPI(RED)
    DISCOVE(RED) SAC(RED)
    HUNGE(RED) WONDE(RED)
    EXPLO(RED) FEATU(RED)
    AUTHO(RED) SEA(RED)
    DA(RED) UNCENSO(RED)
    SOA(RED) ADVENTU(RED)

 

 

    


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Lazarus Dreads His High School Reunion


It’s all anyone asks about anymore—
What was it like? God’s a woman, right?
To think of those same questions—
No kids yet? Have you lost weight?
resurrected without respite
the length of a long,
dull evening in a dank gym.

I swear they were
the whitest, widest streets
I’ve ever seen, the singing
sweeter still than black locust
blooms in spring—
go along with whatever
people suggest because

how can I explain
I was restored before
even the stone rolled back?

How, in the few minutes,
between awaking and
afternoon light flooding in,
I was as happy
as I’ve ever been, rapt and not
waiting in a dark room.


Celisa Steele’s poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Anglican Theological Review, The Comstock Review, Inch, and others and won the Broad River Review 2011 Rash Award in Poetry, The South Carolina Review’s 2009-2010 Poetry Contest, the 2010 Nâzım Hikmet Poetry Competition, one of two honorable mentions in Salem College’s 2012 Rita Dove Poetry Award, and other recognition. In 2011, Emrys Press published her first book, How Language Is Lost.


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