Note from the Editors

 

   SEEING RED 

    ENDU(RED) ADMI(RED)
    DESI(RED) WONDE(RED)
    RUMO(RED) ADO(RED)
    ENAMO(RED) INSPI(RED)
    DISCOVE(RED) SAC(RED)
    HUNGE(RED) WONDE(RED)
    EXPLO(RED) FEATU(RED)
    AUTHO(RED) SEA(RED)
    DA(RED) UNCENSO(RED)
    SOA(RED) ADVENTU(RED)

 

 

    


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Fukushima Sutra

           
Gaki, a Japanese word meaning hungry ghosts

We don't like to cry here in the towns
over the hills from Fukushima.

We didn't lose anyone and the cracked
window panes all have been replaced.

But there is still much work to do.
The ghosts continue to crest the hill

settle in our valley like a cold fog, appearing
sometimes sodden and always sad

in cabs, tea shops, gazing up from the puddles.
It is the nature of gaki to never be sated, 

their deaths so full of questions. We dine with them,
listen, digest the void of unfinished lives so  

the dead become us. We tell them you are here,
you are not here. You hunger, you do not hunger.

The sutra says there is no suffering, nor end
to suffering. Stay, go. The water rises, retreats.

 

 

My Father's Ashes


The ashes of the dead
have surprising heft.
One expects flakes of burned

paper beneath a cold grate.
But what we get has substance,
bits of bone suspended like grains

in a fine flour. I've held them,
run them through my fingers.
Toss them, and the wind winnows

the gravel of bones from
the whisper of everything else.
They drop, obedient to gravity,

dead weight of the dead
devoid of wonder's lift while
ashes play on invisible winds

its arcs and swoops revealed
like a musical score describes
a dirge, an arioso.


Robin Boyd lives in New Hampshire. With degrees in creative writing and environmental education, her work explores the edges where  human and nonhuman worlds connect and inform each other.  She works as a free-lance writer and a grants manager for a New Hampshire foundation that makes grants to people with disabilities. Her most recent work appears in Whole Terrain, Crab Creek Review and Heron Tree. Her book of poems, Among the Slow Roots, was published in 2007 by Gap Mountain Press.


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